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Guitar Maker

Christian Hatstatt

2

THE JANGLE WAVE

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As far as I can remember, my first musical emotions came from the pieces of music I was studying on the piano when I was 7. I must admit that was nothing compared to the emotions I felt when listening to the early Beatles, Who or Byrds albums I started to listen to when I was around 12. At the time, most of the iconic singer-songwriters like John Lennon or Roger McGuinn played the “Ricky” guitars. I only discovered years later that the originator, named Adolph Rickenbacker, was born a few miles from where I grew up and that he (together with his partner George Beauchamp) actually developped the first electric guitar named “the frying pan” which basically was a lap-steel with an electro-magnetic pickup.

Ironically, the guitars of that time were rarely used for solo work with a few exceptions, also other brands were perceived more appropriate for guitar solo work which made important developments in the course of the 60s. However, the Beatles and Roger McGuinn created some amazing chords, arpeggios and riffs which remain classics still today.

As a guitar designer, I always knew I wanted to pay homage to these times, concepts and music, I also wanted to incorporate some of these concepts into an instrument that would be versatile for both chord and solo work. As a result we decided that the Magneto T-Wave would be a marvellous chassis for this project. Finland’s pickup maker Veijo RAUTIA helped us a lot with his version of the “Toaster” pickup which we decided to combine with our midrangy T-WAVE MTL-2 pickup.

The result is here, we called it the “Jangle Wave”. The neck pickup adds some nice higher midrange “Jangle” frequencies and makes it perfect for both cutting though solos as well as thick chord works.

there we go, filing the slots on the nut.

there we go, filing the slots on the nut.

Setting the exact position of the slots on the bone nut.

Setting the exact position of the slots on the bone nut.

Mr. Iwamoto is joining the neck and the body of a T-Wave.

Mr. Iwamoto is joining the neck and the body of a T-Wave.

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Long time friend and luthier Aki is carefully mounting the string ferrules on the T-Wave body.

Long time friend and luthier Aki is carefully mounting the string ferrules on the T-Wave body.

Luthier Nogu is filing the fret edges so they look and feel good!

Luthier Nogu is filing the fret edges so they look and feel good!

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Lite Mercury Silver Sonnet bodies right after clear coat finish.

Lite Mercury Silver Sonnet bodies right after clear coat finish.

Pic from the drying room: this is what the bodies look like when the last coat (clear coat) is applied.

Pic from the drying room: this is what the bodies look like when the last coat (clear coat) is applied.

Close-up on the Mercury Silver finish. It has a matte looks as the clear top coat has not been sprayed yet.

Close-up on the Mercury Silver finish. It has a matte looks as the clear top coat has not been sprayed yet.

next step is color, here the stain on the Mercury Silver finish.

next step is color, here the stain on the Mercury Silver finish.

after the primer, the white undercoat for the T-Wave bodies

after the primer, the white undercoat for the T-Wave bodies

urethane finish for the T-Wave necks

urethane finish for the T-Wave necks

primer for the T-Wave bodies as well.

primer for the T-Wave bodies as well.

All contours have been done. the Sonnet body goes into the first finishing stage with a primer coat.

All contours have been done. the Sonnet body goes into the first finishing stage with a primer coat.

and here is the Sonnet body with all routings done, next step is to make the “elbow” and “belly” contours and to rout the body side radius to 8mm.

and here is the Sonnet body with all routings done, next step is to make the “elbow” and “belly” contours and to rout the body side radius to 8mm.